Tel: 503.974.9078

Fax: 503.974.9083

info@connectoregon.com

 

17120 Pilkington Rd

Lake Oswego, OR 

97035

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Notice of Non-Discrimination

© 2023 Connect Physical Therapy

PELVIC HEALTH SERVICES

Treatment approaches are tailored to the individual, and we will partner with you to determine the optimal treatment approach based on your complaints, medical and surgical history and an examination.  Depending on your comfort level and understanding of pelvic rehabilitation, the first session may focus on improving understanding about your condition and education regarding the pelvic examination approach.  The examination and treatment can occur on a subsequent visit. 

We are able to treat many sports and orthopedic injuries in addition to the following men’s and women’s health conditions:

Women

  • Preventative/Wellness screening to ensure healthy pelvic floor and/or orthopedic function

  • Wellness program to ready the body for pregnancy

  • Prenatal and Postpartum pain conditions that can intensify or develop during or following pregnancy:  Low back pain, Pelvic pain, Thoracic/Rib pain, Neck pain, Sciatica, Carpel Tunnel Syndrome, Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

  • Postpartum care for return to exercise and to remedy discomfort during intercourse and speculum exams

  • Pain and warmth in breasts during nursing (mastitis).   This treatment is done in coordination with care provider recommendations.

  • Perineal and abdominal discomfort prior to and after delivery, including care for episiotomy and caesarean section scars

  • Urinary leakage associated with coughing, sneezing, laughing, jumping, running and lifting in all age groups, including athletic populations

  • Urinary and/or Bowel movement excessive frequency during day and night which may also be associated with leakage.

  • Pelvic Pain experienced during intercourse, tampon insertion and gynecological exams in all age groups.

  • Vulvodynia (marked sensitivity to touch in the vulvar region)in all age groups

  • Pelvic Organ Prolapse (descent of bladder, rectum and/or uterus where these structures are attached to the vaginal wall or cervix).

  • Complications from surgery, radiation, and/or chemotherapy related to breast and other gynecological cancers.

  • Female Athlete Triad:  Symptoms can include reduced bone density, skipped periods and stress fractures in athletic population associated with intense training and inadequate caloric intake making it difficult to meet physical demands on the body.

  • Pain with urination or defecation

  • Restrictions in connective tissue in abdomen and pelvis after surgery

  • Pain in the pelvis and or tailbone (coccyx) region with sitting

  • Vaginismus

  • Sacroiliac pain

  • Fecal Incontinence

  • Irritable bowel syndrome

  • Diastasis recti

  • Pubic bone pain         

Men

  • Urinary leakage associated with laughing, coughing, sneezing, running, jumping and lifting in all age groups, including athletic populations

  • Fecal Incontinence

  • Urinary and/or Bowel movement excessive frequency during day and night which may or may not be associated with leakage.

  • Chronic pelvic pain (prostatitis)

  • Pain with urination or defecation

  • Restrictions and pain in scar tissues in abdomen and pelvis after surgery

  • Pre and post prostate surgery rehabilitation

  • Pain in the pelvis and or tailbone (coccyx) region with sitting

  • Irritable bowel syndrome

  • Sacroiliac pain      

  • Pain with urination

  • Difficulty initiating urination

  • Return of function and pain relief for men following prostatectomy

  • Pelvic pain onset in men associated with weight lifting, cycling, running

 

Options for treatment that may be considered include the following:

  • Exercise prescription individualized to improve weak or tight areas in the entire body to further enhance pelvic function.

  • Pelvic floor assessment to determine if strengthening the muscles, stretching the muscles or a combination of the two approaches make sense.

  • Connective tissue massage and gentle release techniques to reduce pain in abdominal, inguinal, perineum and vulvar regions.

  • Manual therapy to release tension in structures in the pelvic, hips, low back and other areas beyond the pelvis that can also contribute to pelvic pain and pelvic floor dysfunction.

  • Visceral mobilization

  • Fascial mobilization, muscle energy and strain counter strain techniques to enhance function of the joint structures surrounding the pelvis.

  • Education and cognitive behavioral therapy approaches to help “downregulate” pain responses in the body .

  • Assessment of fluid intake (type and amount) to determine if fluid volume and fluid type are contributing to bothersome urinary or bowel symptoms.  Food intake evaluation may also be  considered based on symptoms.

  • Exercise prescription individualized to improve weak or tight areas in the entire body to further enhance pelvic function.

 

For more information on pelvic health, check out these resources:

  • http://www.womenshealthapta.org: Section on Women’s Health, APTA. Note that the Section on Women’s Health is working to change its name to include male pelvic rehabilitation.

  • http://www.pelvicpainrehab.com: Great website with frequent postings on pain conditions, prolapse and incontinence, and includes conditions related to men.